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20121027
20121104
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the traffic lights are out. you might understand why new yorkers are getting a little fed up. jim axelrod is there tonight. jim. >> reporter: well, scott, this water-filled tunnel behind me is just one of the many challenges sandy has left for new yorkers who are facing a transportation nightmare. on this road into new york city, gasoline may be hard to find, but frustration summer is not. >> get in front of me! get in front of me! if it makes you happy. >> reporter: supply isn't the problem. it's the power blackouts that are keeping pumps from operating. >> move it! move it! >> reporter: aaa says just a their of station stations are open in new jersey and long island. this line was three hours long. >> worth the wait. >> reporter: house of representatives waiting for gas is followed by hours to get over a bridge or through a tunnel. > tunnel. to reduce congestion, police are turning away cars with less than three people until midnight tomorrow. >> move to the front! let's go! >> reporter: new york city buses resumed running today, and they were crammed tight. cedric taylor is a security
help your family. >> pelley: reports from jim axelrod, anna werner and seth doane. unemployment rises. the economy creates more jobs, but not enough. anthony mason on the final economic report before the election. >> we're four days away from a fresh start. >> we made real progress these past four years. >> reporter: a campaign 2012 report from bob schieffer. and "on the road." steve hartman with children of the storm. silver linings in a dark week. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. 110. that's the new death toll from hurricane sandy, and it's not likely to stop there. bodies are being found today in homes as rescue workers reach into the hardest-hit areas. the pictures that struck us today were of justice one family in staten island, new york. 14-year-old kate at her grandparent's house. her mother, julie, trying to pull something recognizable from the rubble. and sheila and dominick trayna holding on to their memories and contemplating the future. the insurance industry estimates economic losses from the storm at $
, there was brutal gridlock on the roads. some of the rail service is now returning, and jim axelrod takes us down under. >> reporter: where are we? >> we're down here at the main exit and entrance of south ferry terminal. >> joe leader took us down for a look at the hardest hit of all 468 new york city subway stations. south ferry, at the southern tip of manhattan. >> we had bar kayed up top with wood plywood and sandbags to keep the water out, but when the surge came, it brought down all this material that doesn't belong here. large pieces of lumber, and that broke through the barrier and allowed more water to come in. >> reporter: that's water just a few steps down from the top of the steps. but the tracks are another two levels underneath that. so as much as the water's gone down, we're still two levels worth of water till we get to the tracks? >> absolutely. >> reporter: it will take a week alone just to pump out the water. but the subway system will begin limited service tomorrow. limited mass transit has left city streets choked with cars, a telling sign of just how badly the city needs to
the storm. buses are running and roads are reopening but the subways are still closed. jim axelrod is in lower manhattan. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the sea water that came over that wall and flowed into the underground power stations and subway stations has crippled lower manhattan. and new york city transit officials say this is the biggest disaster to ever hit the transit system. superstorm sandy may have moved on but parts of new york city remain paralyzed in her wake. >> restoring power and mass transit remain the two biggest challenges in the days ahead. that recovery is a mammoth job. >> it's the worst thing that happened to this city certainly since 9/11. >> reporter: new york city subway system which averages more than 5 million commuters per work day is closed indefinitely because all seven subway tunnels linking manhattan to brooklyn and queens are flooded. at some stations near battery park where monday's surge of sea water hit hardest stairwells looked more like swimming pools. >> there was no way to prepare that would have kept the water out. >> rep
legs. the redskins don't stop anybody which has jim hazlet turned gone and he certainly knows that. >> we've given up too many yards, big plays, and then the rush, you know, we haven't had as many sacks as we did last year. i thought we did much better last week. we could continue to improve and be better in those areas. >> milking cows in the background there? what was that? we know maryland has put the p in patchwork offense this year. four quarterbacks lost to injury which means the only conceivable way they win tomorrow is to lean on their defense. georgia tech's triple option is a test and head coach randy edsel certainly knows it. >> that first series is very critical, because, again, you want to try to get off on the right foot. you tell your guys, hey, it is going to be a lot faster in the game than it is what you saw in practice, and you've got to get used to the from the beginning. >> all right, no milking cows there. >>> five good games going to be featured tonight. jeb stewart versus falls church, the aforementioned bell game. thanks to the 4,000 who voted this week des
in hard-hit new york city where president obama has just declared a state of emergency. jim axelrod is at battery park in lower manhattan which was inundated with water. good morning. >> reporter: when i spoke to police commissioner ray kelly here yesterday, i asked him what his biggest concern was about the approaching storm. he didn't hesitate. blackouts, he said. that's exactly what new yor this morning. super storm sandy made landfall late monday. a wet and windy nightmare. >> we knew this was going to be a great, dangerous storm. the storm met our expectations. >> reporter: sandy exceeded them. around 9:00 p.m. the storm produced a record surge at battery park in manhattan. 13.88 feet. breaching the sea wall and flooding the area. manhattan's waterfront seemed to disappear as the surge rushed over the wall. >> unknown. storm of the century. >> reporter: roads and cars were quickly covered. ground zero was engulfed. across the harbor in brooklyn, there was so much flooding around coney island that emergency responders couldn't reach the area. corrosive sea wa
of serious grid lock. jim axelrod is in lower manhattan. >> reporter: that's a crucial piece of news. 227,000 customers still without power in manhattan, although we are told now by saturday power should be restored fully in new york. now, as for the traffic that we're talking about, the massive traffic situation, city's bridges and tunnels absolutely choked with vehicles. traffic lines stretching for miles. through midnight tonight, police will refuse entry into new york for vehicles less than three passengers. public transportation is helping, although lines for shuttle buses reached three hours yesterday. getting rid of water is the top job here. a group of what's called unwatering experts from the army corps of engineers is here to help and they expect to suck out about 10 million gallons of water. from california, 70 power trucks are being air lifted here to help restore power. but the bottom line, charlie, is the more -- the quicker the power is restored, the sooner congestion will be reduced. charlie, norah? >> jim axle rodriguez, thank you. >>> the cia is fighting back against cha
substation. a quarter of a million homes and businesses lost power. jim axelrod reports the trouble was just beginning. >> reporter: workers are now taking down the boards that were supposed to keep water out of subway stations and loading sandbags back on to the truck. having done their best in a battle they could have never won there was no way to prepare that would have kept the water out? >> no, no. no way. how are you going to stop water? water does what it wants to do. >> reporter: seven tunnels linking manhattan to brooklyn and queens are flooded. the signals, switches and third rails are covered with sludge. m.t.a. workman john o'neil went down for a look in the south ferry station and reported back. >> it's probably up to the two poles from the top. full to the top. forget about it. >> reporter: even after the water has gone away, 6,200 subway cars must be inspected along with 600 miles of track and 468 subway stations. >> the m.t.a. last night faced a disaster as devastating at it has ever faced. >> reporter: joe loda is chairman of the metropolitan transit authority. >> sandy wrea
transportation troubles. jim axelrod is at the tip of lower manhattan outside of the staten island ferry terminal. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. that's a big step for new yorkers getting partial subway service restored to help ease the congestion on city streets. there won't be any subway cars coming in and out of this station not today, not tomorrow and not for a while it would appear. three days after superstorm sandy swept through new york the city's road to recovery is literally grid locked. >> the traffic is terrible. takes 45 minutes to go four blocks. >> reporter: with the city subway system still not operating commuters turned manhattan streets into parking lots. a telling sign of just how badly the city needs its mass transit back. >> i'm declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: this morning 14 out of 23 subway lines will begin operating. but none will be able to run below 34th street in manhattan and into brooklyn. multiple tunnels and stations in that area remain flooded with sea water. >> where are he? >> reporter: joe leader oversees maintenance for
this program on when travel will get back to normal. also jim axelrod takes us down inside the city subway station still flooded by two stories of water. the denverration is so bad on new jersey's barrier island many residents won't be allowed back for days, but our own bensy treysy went into a hard hit area. plus jeb bush will be with us when we see you at 7:00 and talk politics. >> thank you. >>> as charlie was saying sandy menaced the east coast closing schools, markets, businesses and transit. >> and it is going to take more than a little time to recover from the wreckage. there are pledges by government officials from the white house, on down, to help overcome this devastation. the worst the atlantic storm in the nation's history. >> kristin fisher has more on that recovery effort. >> reporter: well, new york city slowly starting to show signs of life after hurricane sandy. but the city that never sleeps still in the dark and now the cloneup begins. millions of people in the dark, and they're having to clean up you know the damage caused by the wind, all the rain and perhaps most shoc
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10